Six days after forever

 
six-days-after-forever-1

Six days after forever

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research-based film music for Yoi Kawakubo’s video work

2019/20 mins/stereo

the piece can be listened to 24/7 by using (preferably good) headphones/earphones and connecting a handheld device to the Musicity webapp on your smartphone at Leadenhall Market (London).

commissioned by Musicity x Sculpture in the City

Exhibited at The National Art Center, Tokyo

23 Jan. - 3 Mar. 2019

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リサーチ・ベースの映画音楽(川久保ジョイの映像作品)

2019/20分/ステレオ

国立新美術館(東京)、21st DOMANI・明日展にて発表

2019年1月23日から3月3日

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This research-based film music not only functions as music for the film, but also as an independent layer, which contributes to the narrative of the film. The main reference for the film and music was the future history novel, Last And First Men written by Olaf Stapledon in 1930, which is ‘a history of the evolution of humankind over the next 2 billion years’ (Gateway, 2012). The music was designed as being sent by the clone-android made from the ‘Last Men’ in the novel. We speculated that the last, youngest and noblest boy who appears at the very end of the novel, could be related to the Patagonian Divine Boy of the ‘First Men’. Also, the episode of that Patagonian people were extinguished by nuclear holocausts, resonates with the film, where nuclear energy is one of the core themes. Therefore, we decided to reference especially the Patagonian people of the ‘First Men’ and the ‘Last Men (Eighteenth Men)’ in the novel.

All the sounds are made from eight-year-old boy’s (Kawakubo’s first son) voice. The content of the recordings are the readings of two texts. One is the message directed to the protagonists of the film by the past clone-android on the planet from aeons ago. The other is the text from Kawakubo’s The God of the Labyrinth (2016), which can be regarded as a prequel to the film.

Because ‘the ancient [“]Indian[”] and Peruvian stock had come into dominance’ (Stapledon 2012, p. 80-81) and ‘the Incas were at last to triumph over their conquerors’ (Stapledon 2012, p. 81) among the last group of human beings of the ‘First Men’, the roots of Inca music were researched. One of them is the traditional music in El Alto, Bolivia. El Alto means ‘The Heights’ in Spanish, and its average altitude is 4,150 m (13,615 ft). A longing for height is the recurring trait of humankind throughout the novel. Thus, I decided to reference the track WAYN~U FIESTA / FARMERS OF RAQAYPAMPA, which is the recording of the indigenous people playing their traditional music in El Alto. The first melody, the second melody, the bass notes and the harmonic progression are taken from the track. The following is the explanation about the track.

In the Alteña region, the tabla charango is played from All Saints' Day to Easter, taking in the Carnival, in other words during the agricultural season; it is therefore clearly associated with the beings of the Ukhu Pacha (the underground) and fertility. Its playing technique is characterised by sustained arpeggios, in which the distinctive high-pitched sound of the uñancha is heard, a small chord that rings out on open strings and is specific to this instrument. Women accompany the tabla charango with their singing, attempting to equal the high notes of the uñancha. During the performance of the musical piece and at the end or reprise of a verse, the soloist plays arpeggios, while the women perform an energetic zapateo (stamping) and, very often, the player of the tabla charango joins in.

Use of the musical instrument is associated with amorous conquest and fertility. It is an instrument of the devil (supay), to which farmers (men and women) attach a great deal of importance. (Sánchez 2001)

The lowest bass notes throughout the film were designed to represent the rumble from the Ukhu Pacha (the underground). The aggressive bass notes which appears in the later part of the film were designed to depict ‘the ferocity of natural forces on Neptune’ (Sánchez 2001, p. 245).

For it so happened that the still youthful giant, Neptune, was slowly entering one of his phases of crustal shrinkage, and therefore of earthquake and eruption. Thus the frail colonists found themselves increasingly in danger of being swallowed in sudden fiery crevasses or buried under volcanic dust. Moreover, their squat buildings, when not actually being trampled by lava streams, or warped and cracked by their shifting foundations, were liable to be demolished by the battering-ram thrust of a turbulent and massive atmosphere. Further, the atmosphere’s unwholesome composition killed all possibility of cheerfulness and courage in a race whose nature was doomed to be, even in favourable circumstances, neurotic. (Sánchez 2001, p. 245-246)

The never-ending iteration of the human history is one of the core themes of the film. The length of the first melody keeps being extended over time. The rate of the exponential extension was determined by the Fibonacci numbers, which can be found in natural phenomena. During the iteration of the first melody, the iteration of the second melody occurs, aimed at producing quasi-fractal through the melodies. These musical designs are the responses to the way the ‘Eighteenth Men’ on Neptune perceive time in the novel.

Neptune’s year was at this time about one hundred and sixty-five times the length of the old terrestrial year. The slow seasonal change had an important effect on life’s own rhythms. All but the most ephemeral organisms tended to live through at least one complete year, and the higher mammals survived longer. (Stapledon 2012, p. 246)

The spacial and reverb design of the music was determined by imagining the mixture of a synagogue and the vast aerial space on Neptune. Kawakubo treats the exhibiting space as a religious space similar to Synagogue of El Transito in Toledo, Spain.

[to be updated]

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このリサーチ・ベースの映画音楽は音楽として機能するだけでなく、映画の語り口に独立した一つのレイヤーとして貢献する。映画と音楽のための主な参照対象となったのは、1930年にオラフ・ステープルドンによって書かれた未来史小説、『最後にして最初の人類』(国書刊行会、2004)である。音楽は小説内の「最後の人類」から作られたクローン・アンドロイドから送られたものとしてデザインされた。私たちは、小説の終盤に登場する、最後の、最も若く、最も賢い少年が、「最初の人類」の一人であるパタゴニアの聖なる少年との関連性があるものと推察した。小説内のパタゴニア人たちが核戦争によって絶滅するというエピソードもまた、原子力エネルギーを主要テーマの一つとしているこの映画と共鳴する。ゆえに、小説の中でも特に「第1人類」のパタゴニア人たちと、「最後の人類(第18人類)」を参照対象とした。

すべての音が、8歳の少年(川久保の長男)の声から作られている。録音物の内容は、2種類の文章を読んだもの。一つは映画の主人公たちへの、遠い昔にこの惑星にいたクローン・アンドロイドからのメッセージ。もう一つはこの映画の前日譚とも捉えられる、川久保のThe God of the Labyrinth (2016)からのテキスト。

Because ‘the ancient [“]Indian[”] and Peruvian stock had come into dominance’ (Stapledon 2012, p. 80-81) and ‘the Incas were at last to triumph over their conquerors’ (Stapledon 2012, p. 81) among the last group of human beings of the ‘First Men’, the roots of Inca music were researched. One of them is the traditional music in El Alto, Bolivia. El Alto means ‘The Heights’ in Spanish, and its average altitude is 4,150 m (13,615 ft). A longing for height is the recurring trait of humankind throughout the novel. Thus, I decided to reference the track WAYN~U FIESTA / FARMERS OF RAQAYPAMPA, which is the recording of the indigenous people playing their traditional music in El Alto. The first melody, the second melody, the bass notes and the harmonic progression are taken from the track. The following is the explanation about the track.

In the Alteña region, the tabla charango is played from All Saints' Day to Easter, taking in the Carnival, in other words during the agricultural season; it is therefore clearly associated with the beings of the Ukhu Pacha (the underground) and fertility. Its playing technique is characterised by sustained arpeggios, in which the distinctive high-pitched sound of the uñancha is heard, a small chord that rings out on open strings and is specific to this instrument. Women accompany the tabla charango with their singing, attempting to equal the high notes of the uñancha. During the performance of the musical piece and at the end or reprise of a verse, the soloist plays arpeggios, while the women perform an energetic zapateo (stamping) and, very often, the player of the tabla charango joins in.

Use of the musical instrument is associated with amorous conquest and fertility. It is an instrument of the devil (supay), to which farmers (men and women) attach a great deal of importance. (Sánchez 2001)

The lowest bass notes throughout the film were designed to represent the rumble from the Ukhu Pacha (the underground). The aggressive bass notes which appears in the later part of the film were designed to depict ‘the ferocity of natural forces on Neptune’ (Sánchez 2001, p. 245).

For it so happened that the still youthful giant, Neptune, was slowly entering one of his phases of crustal shrinkage, and therefore of earthquake and eruption. Thus the frail colonists found themselves increasingly in danger of being swallowed in sudden fiery crevasses or buried under volcanic dust. Moreover, their squat buildings, when not actually being trampled by lava streams, or warped and cracked by their shifting foundations, were liable to be demolished by the battering-ram thrust of a turbulent and massive atmosphere. Further, the atmosphere’s unwholesome composition killed all possibility of cheerfulness and courage in a race whose nature was doomed to be, even in favourable circumstances, neurotic. (Sánchez 2001, p. 245-246)

The never-ending iteration of the human history is one of the core themes of the film. The length of the first melody keeps being extended over time. The rate of the exponential extension was determined by the Fibonacci numbers, which can be found in natural phenomena. During the iteration of the first melody, the iteration of the second melody occurs, aimed at producing quasi-fractal through the melodies. These musical designs are the responses to the way the ‘Eighteenth Men’ on Neptune perceive time in the novel.

Neptune’s year was at this time about one hundred and sixty-five times the length of the old terrestrial year. The slow seasonal change had an important effect on life’s own rhythms. All but the most ephemeral organisms tended to live through at least one complete year, and the higher mammals survived longer. (Stapledon 2012, p. 246)

The spacial and reverb design of the music was determined by imagining the mixture of a synagogue and the vast aerial space on Neptune. Kawakubo treats the exhibiting space as a religious space similar to Synagogue of El Transito in Toledo, Spain.

[更新中]

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Related Links

21st “DOMANI: The Art of Tomorrow” Exhibition

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関連リンク

21st DOMANI・明日展

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References

Sánchez, W. C. (2001). Luz Mila Patino Festival 30 Years of Cross-Cultural Encounters Through Music. Bolivia, Simón I. Patiño Foundation.

Stapledon, O. (2012). Last And First Men. S.F. MASTERWORKS, Gateway.

Villavicencio, D. (2001). El charango en las manifestaciones culturales recónditas. Bolivia, Abya-Yala.

Gateway (2012, 2018-07-12). "Last And First Men." Retrieved 4 January, 2019, from https://www.sfgateway.com/titles/olaf-stapledon/last-and-first-men/9780575087996/.

Stapledon, O. (2014). 最後にして最初の人類 [Japanese], Kokushokankokai.

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参考文献

Sánchez, W. C. (2001). Luz Mila Patino Festival 30 Years of Cross-Cultural Encounters Through Music. Bolivia, Simón I. Patiño Foundation.

Stapledon, O. (2012). Last And First Men. S.F. MASTERWORKS, Gateway.

Villavicencio, D. (2001). El charango en las manifestaciones culturales recónditas. Bolivia, Abya-Yala.

Gateway (2012, 2018-07-12). "Last And First Men." Retrieved 4 January, 2019, from https://www.sfgateway.com/titles/olaf-stapledon/last-and-first-men/9780575087996/.

Stapledon, O. (2014). 最後にして最初の人類 [Japanese], 国書刊行会.

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